South Africa

Joined CPA in 1980 | Website: www.parliament.gov.za

Contacts

Branch Vice-President
Gauteng Provincial Legislature
Private Bag X52
Johannesburg , Gauteng
South Africa
Gauteng ZA
Acting Branch Secretary
Gauteng Provincial Legislature
Private Bag X52
Johannesburg , Gauteng
South Africa
Gauteng ZA
Branch President
Kwazulu-Natal Provincial Legislature
Private Bag X9112
Pietermaritzburg , KwaZulu-Natal
South Africa
KwaZulu-Natal ZA

Members

  • Gauteng

    Each of the nine provinces in South Africa has a Provincial Legislature, which elects the province's Premier and appoints ten Members of the Executive Council (MECs). Our Constitution acknowledges...

    Gauteng

    Seat of Parliament:
    Johannesburg
    South Africa
    26° 12' 14.76" S, 28° 2' 50.316" E
    Population: 11,191,700 Constitution: Province Date of Independence: CPA Branch Formed: 01 Jan 1996 Voting Age: 18
    Branch Profile:

    Each of the nine provinces in South Africa has a Provincial Legislature, which elects the province's Premier and appoints ten Members of the Executive Council (MECs). Our Constitution acknowledges that all provinces are different and, therefore, allows Provincial Legislatures to independently make laws, which apply exclusively to the needs of their province. These are all laws that concern the running and governance of each province, which are defined in the Constitution. The Gauteng Provincial Legislature is not a government department nor is it another government body, but an institution entrusted with overseeing the efficiency of government in the delivery of services as prioritised by the voting people of Gauteng. The GPL is composed of 30 ? 80 members of different political parties in proportion to their national voting strength (meaning, representation as dictated by the public vote). These members are then referred to as Members of the Provincial Legislature (MPLs), who sit in the Provincial Legislature, at the Johannesburg City Hall. The Provincial Parliament is generally referred to as the ?The House?. And when MPLs sit to discuss and debate issues and to pass laws that concern Gauteng, the general term used is ?The House Sitting?. The 30 ? 80 MPLs are divided into 14 Committees, with all political parties being represented in each Committee to ensure balanced views. These Committees convene regularly to discuss Bills and work with Provincial Government Departments to prioritise programmes for service delivery in Gauteng. Most of the groundwork for the Bills is done in Committee meetings, so by the time the Bill goes before ?The House? to be voted on, parties have decided in favour of it or not. At the Sitting of The House, each member (and/ or party) has an opportunity to place their opinion of the Bill on record. Bills are passed by the rule of majority when MPLs vote during the tabling of a Bill at a House Sitting. The debates of the House are always open to the public; and although members of the public may not speak during these, they are always welcome to attend. MPLs are sitting in their Party Caucuses preparing new Bills, which subsequently go to Committees and then The House. Party Caucuses are only for party members and are not open to the public. Members of the public can direct their views and concerns to Committees for attention. This is also the best way for Committees to interact with the people of Gauteng and to get to know about the issues that affect the public, which are then discussed by Committees as potential Bills. It is also a platform for Citizens of Gauteng to play an active role in law making processes of the province. It is important for all members of the public, who want to partake in the process of making laws for Gauteng other than during public hearings, to understand how the Committees work. For more information on dates, times and topics of debates at The House, please contact the GPL?s Public Relations Unit on: 011 498 5555 or visit the Gauteng Provincial Legislature at the Johannesburg City Hall, (Corner of Loveday & President Streets). Since 6 May 2009, the premier has been Nomvula Mokonyane. Paul Mashatile, the former provincial minister of finance and economic affairs and the current provincial chairman of ANC in the Gauteng Province, was Premier from 7 October 2008 until Mokonyane's election. He replaced former premier Mbhazima Shilowa, who was premier from 1999. Shilowa resigned in protest against the decision by the ANC national executive committee (NEC) to remove former president Thabo Mbeki from office.

  • Mpumalanga

    Mpumalanga Province is one of nine provinces of the Republic of South Africa established in terms of the Interim Constitution, Act 200 of 1993. Following the country's first democratic elections...

    Mpumalanga

    Seat of Parliament:
    Nelspruit
    South Africa
    25° 27' 56.988" S, 30° 59' 7.008" E
    Population: 3,617,600 Constitution: Province Date of Independence: CPA Branch Formed: 01 Jan 1995 Voting Age: 18
    Branch Profile:

    Mpumalanga Province is one of nine provinces of the Republic of South Africa established in terms of the Interim Constitution, Act 200 of 1993. Following the country's first democratic elections in 1994, the first Legislature was inaugurated in May 1994 as the Eastern Transvaal Legislature. In August 1995, the province made a break with its colonial past when it changed its name to Mpumalanga, translated to the place where the sun rises. The Legislature also changed its name to Mpumalanga Provincial Legislature. Composition of the Legislature The Legislature is a provincial parliament and has its seat in the provincial capital, Nelspruit. Mpumalanga Provincial Legislature is constituted of 30 Members of the Provincial Legislature (MPLs), who are elected through a proportional representation system, i.e. in accordance to the number of votes obtained by each party in the elections in the province. The term of the provincial legislature is five years. The Premier may dissolve the provincial legislature before the expiry of its term if the Legislature has adopted a resolution to dissolve with a supporting majority of its members and if three years have passed since the legislature was elected. Sittings When MPLs meet together to discuss and debate on issues, we call this a "Sitting of the House". Sittings of the Mpumalanga Provincial Legislature take place on Mondays to Thursdays at 14:15 and on Fridays at 10H00. Functions of the Legislature The Legislature has three main functions: Law-making ?MPLs discuss, debate, amend and vote on laws for the province ?Initiate or prepare legislation, except money Bills Oversight ?Maintain oversight on the exercise of Provincial Executive authority in the Province, including the implementation of legislation and any Provincial organ of state ?Approve budgets for Provincial Government Departments ?Question government officials about their work ?Seek explanation how government spent their previous budgets and how they will spend their new budgets Public participation and education ?Conduct public hearings on laws that are envisaged ?Educate the public on the law-making processes Committees The Legislature may appoint committees to carry out a particular assignment specified by a resolution of the Legislature. The Mpumalanga Provincial Legislature has Select Committees and Portfolio Committees. Committee meetings are open to the public. Select Committees Select Committees are largely responsible for the management and operations of the Legislature or any matter assigned to these by the Speaker. Portfolio Committees Portfolio committees ensure that all Provincial executive organs of state in the Province are accountable to it. National Council of Provinces (NCOP) The National Council of Provinces represents the provinces to ensure that provincial interests are taken into account in the national sphere of government. The Mpumalanga Provincial Legislature is required to appoint 6 permanent and 4 special delegates to the National Council of Provinces. The appointment of delegates is determined in accordance to the proportion of votes attained by each party during the election.

  • Kwazulu Natal

    When governance was granted to Natal in 1893, the new Legislative Assembly took over the chamber that was used by the Legislative Council since 1889. Further extensions to the parliamentary...

    Kwazulu Natal

    Seat of Parliament:
    Ulundi/Pietermaritzburg
    South Africa
    29° 37' 4.44" S, 30° 22' 56.964" E
    Population: 10,645,400 Constitution: Province Date of Independence: CPA Branch Formed: 01 Jan 1996 Voting Age: 18
    Branch Profile:

    When governance was granted to Natal in 1893, the new Legislative Assembly took over the chamber that was used by the Legislative Council since 1889. Further extensions to the parliamentary building were made. The building was unoccupied until 1902 when it was used without being officially opened, due to the fact that the country was engulfed in the Anglo-Boer war. The war also affected the Legislative Assembly, which had to move the venue of its sittings when the chamber was used as a military hospital. The Legislative Assembly and the Legislative Council buildings, both national monuments, formed a colonial Parliament of two houses: a Council of 11 nominated members and an Assembly of 37 elected members. The Natal Parliament was disbanded in 1910 when the Union of South Africa was formed, and the Assembly became the meeting place of the Natal Provincial Council. The Council was disbanded in 1986. Since then, the premises have been tenanted by civil servants. Committees of the former Tricameral Parliament occasionally used the chamber. The African National Congress (ANC) hold power in the provincial legislature, winning the province with a convincing overall majority in South Africa's 2009 elections. Their chief opponents were the Inkatha Freedom Party, allied with the Democratic Alliance. Breakup of the 80-seat legislature from the 2009 elections: African National Congress (ANC): 51 Inkatha Freedom Party (IFP); 18 Democratic Alliance (DA): 7 Minority Front (MF): 2 African Christian Democratic Party (ACDP): 1 Congress of the People (COPE): 1

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